IMG_8520I had this bookcase for while and was planing to up-cycle, but was always leaving behind. In a Sunday afternoon while my husband was fixing a few things around the house, I decided was time to do it. I thought, it’s now or never.

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The top was cracked when I’ve got it from a Freecycler and whoever did the job, tried their best, I believe, but the result wasn’t quite the way I wanted. So I had to unglue the 2 pieces of wood and glue it again, then fill the gap with wood filler, sanded down, before I start painting.

I didn’t want to spend much time on this bookcase, so I went for the fastest route. I didn’t sanded down the rest of the bookcase, only the top. Then I’ve removed the 2 removable shelves (the middle one was fixed), and the top was already removed.

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I’ve gave one coat of Annie Sloan Chalk Paint in French Linen on the frame inside and out, and a coat of Graphite on the inside back panel and the fixed shelf. I finished with clear wax in almost the entire piece except the fixed shelf which I’ve finished with a coat of lacquer for more durability. I’ve also gave a light sand on corners and edges for a distressed look. IMG_8530

With 2 years working with furniture up-cycling I’ve found out that applying wax with a round brush is easier than applying with a cloth, and the result is way better.

The 2 removable shelves I’ve decide to leave in natural wood, for a bit of warm touch, and applied a coat of dark walnut wax for a darker tone than pine.

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Than I’ve stylised with vintage old books and a bit of texture with wooden boxes, wicker baskets, glassware and lanterns with candle and sand. That’s it, a job made in one afternoon and one morning.

It doesn’t matter what size of furniture I’m working, even if it’s small and I can finished in the same day, like this bookcase, but I always finish the furniture on the following day. I like to leave the paint to dry overnight, even with a paint that dries quite fast, like Annie Sloan. I like to let the paint settle well on the wood before applying the wax or lacquer.

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